Florida Man Admits To Drinking In Car, But Not While Driving Local news reported the man slurring his words when police pulled him over. He had a bottle of Jim Beam in his passenger seat but said he'd been sipping only at stop signs and lights. He went to jail.
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Florida Man Admits To Drinking In Car, But Not While Driving

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Florida Man Admits To Drinking In Car, But Not While Driving

Florida Man Admits To Drinking In Car, But Not While Driving

Florida Man Admits To Drinking In Car, But Not While Driving

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/629361979/629361980" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Local news reported the man slurring his words when police pulled him over. He had a bottle of Jim Beam in his passenger seat but said he'd been sipping only at stop signs and lights. He went to jail.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. A Florida man was pulled over for what appeared to be drinking and driving. That's according to local news, which reports the man was slurring his words and there was a bottle of Jim Beam in his passenger seat. When a police officer asked, the man admitted, yes, he had been drinking but, he said, not while driving. He'd been sipping whiskey at stop signs and traffic lights. Creative defense, but he still went to jail for driving under the influence. It's MORNING EDITION.

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