Archaeologists Find 14,500-Year-Old Bread Archaeologists in Jordan's Black Desert found the burnt remains of bread, baked more than 14,000 years ago. It proves people were making bread far earlier than originally known.
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Archaeologists Find 14,500-Year-Old Bread

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Archaeologists Find 14,500-Year-Old Bread

Archaeologists Find 14,500-Year-Old Bread

Archaeologists Find 14,500-Year-Old Bread

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630008575/630008576" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Archaeologists in Jordan's Black Desert found the burnt remains of bread, baked more than 14,000 years ago. It proves people were making bread far earlier than originally known.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Archaeologists in Jordan's Black Desert have made an amazing discovery - a stone fireplace, and in it, the burnt remains of bread baked over 14,000 years ago. It proves people were making bread far earlier than originally known, years before plant cultivation. It looks like pita and was made of wild cereals like barley and oats. Archaeologists reproduced the recipe. They say it's gritty and salty and a little sweet. It's MORNING EDITION.

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