Panel Questions That Subway Smell; Queen Shade.
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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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That Subway Smell; Queen Shade.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, of course, it is time for you to answer more questions from this week's news. Mo, last week, President Trump met with Queen Elizabeth on his visit to England. It seemed very cordial. But this week, royal watchers have suggested the queen was actually criticizing the Trumps the whole time using what?

MO ROCCA: A rabid corgi - I don't know.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No.

ROCCA: What would she have....

SAGAL: It was a subtle method of communication - very appropriate to a queen.

ROCCA: OK. She was doing something with the scepter. She was...

(LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: She was doing something.

SAGAL: No. Well, no one has asked the queen - people are speculating. No one has asked the queen directly about this because they were afraid to broach the subject.

ROCCA: Oh. She used something - she didn't wear a brooch.

SAGAL: Well...

ROCCA: Oh, she had a Death Star brooch on.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I'm going to give it to you because it more or less answered. She used jewelry to comment upon the Trumps...

ROCCA: Oh.

SAGAL: ...Her brooches, in fact.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

HELEN HONG: Oh.

SAGAL: According to royal jewel watchers - and there is such a thing - the queen, in her public events, often selects specific items from her jewelry collection to send messages at public appearances. For example, whenever she appears with Prince Philip, she wears a brooch that spells out in diamonds I'm with stupid.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So this one brooch blogger who has examined this says that on the day she met the Trumps, the queen wore a brooch given to her as a personal gift by the Obamas. Perhaps...

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: ...Royal fans...

ROCCA: You lost me at brooch blogger.

(LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: I love that so much.

SAGAL: Then - and it goes on. Then remember that day that President Trump kept the queen waiting for 15 minutes in the sun, and then he walked in front of her? On that day, says this blogger, she wore a brooch that she had once worn at her father's funeral many, many years ago, which observers say might indicate her unhappiness about the event - that and the fact that with him in front of her, she was walking while mouthing, what a wanker.

(LAUGHTER)

HONG: She also - they didn't mention the pendant she was wearing around her neck, which was a gold middle finger.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yes.

ALONZO BODDEN: I just love that the queen can talk smack that subtly.

SAGAL: That's how they roll.

(APPLAUSE)

BODDEN: That's how you throw shade right there. Like, did you notice the brooch? Like, that is fantastic. She wore a brooch that the Obamas gave her because a little thing like that - Trump will never forget that. That's going to hurt him...

SAGAL: Well, now - you know, hang on...

BODDEN: ...Forever.

SAGAL: ...Because people say, well, come on. This is a little too subtle. What is she doing? But think about it. If you really want to make sure that Donald Trump gets a message, pin it to a woman's chest.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Alonzo, Austria is in the middle of a brutal heat wave. In reaction, the city of Vienna's public transit system has taken what step?

BODDEN: Public transit in Austria...

SAGAL: So here's the problem. It's very, very hot.

BODDEN: It's very hot. I'm assuming already that they're air-conditioned.

SAGAL: Instead of smelling like old socks, the train will now smell like Old Spice.

BODDEN: They're putting cologne in the ventilation system of the...

SAGAL: No, no. They're not being so...

BODDEN: Oh, they're actually using Old Spice?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That was not a plug. It was a pun. No. They're handing - I'll just give it to you, Alonzo. They're handing out free deodorant to all the passengers.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

BODDEN: That's something like - well, yeah. That's not exactly what I said. Is there...

(LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: Are people disrobing?

BODDEN: I just want to ask, like, so prior to the heat wave, nobody in Austria was wearing - see that's why I haven't been there.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I know.

BODDEN: That's why - those non-deodorant countries are...

SAGAL: Austria's heat wave is historically bad with temperatures reaching Celsius numbers that would probably seem super high if we knew what they meant.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So Vienna's U-Bahn - that's what they call it - is handing out 14,000 sticks of free deodorant to passengers.

ROCCA: Also known as a PU-Bahn (ph), but go on.

SAGAL: Yes. This is in contrast to a solution used by subway systems in the U.S. where they mask all the body odor with urine.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: But this is a horrible solution in the sense that anyone who's been on any form of public transportation - like, no. I don't want you lifting your shirt to put your deodorant on.

ROCCA: Exactly.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: I'd rather just - go ahead with the funk. It's a 20-minute ride.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: There's things - you're going to see things that you don't want to see because whenever people are anxious to take off their shirt, it's someone you want to not take off their shirt.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CLOSE TO YOU")

KAREN CARPENTER: (Singing) Why do birds suddenly appear every time you are near? Just like me, they long to be close to you. Why do stars...

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