Teenager Breaks Into House, Asks For Wi-Fi Password A 17-year-old in Palo Alto, Calif. was arrested after allegedly breaking into a couple's home. According to the police, he sneaked into the house and asked the sleeping residents for their password.
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Teenager Breaks Into House, Asks For Wi-Fi Password

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Teenager Breaks Into House, Asks For Wi-Fi Password

Teenager Breaks Into House, Asks For Wi-Fi Password

Teenager Breaks Into House, Asks For Wi-Fi Password

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/632566921/632566922" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A 17-year-old in Palo Alto, Calif. was arrested after allegedly breaking into a couple's home. According to the police, he sneaked into the house and asked the sleeping residents for their password.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A teenager in Palo Alto, Calif., was arrested after allegedly breaking into a couple's home. But here's where it gets really strange. According to the police, after the 17-year-old snuck into the house, he actually woke up the couple sleeping in their bedroom and asked for their Wi-Fi password. Maybe he thought they'd be cool with it - you know, just let him stream some videos, kick back, maybe order some stuff on Amazon Prime. Alas, no. One of the owners pushed the kid out of the house before the cops arrived. It's MORNING EDITION.

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