Birds Of Chicago On Mountain Stage Birds of Chicago make an electrifying second appearance on Mountain Stage thanks to charming lyrics and close-knit harmonies.

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Birds Of Chicago

Brian Blauser /Mountain Stage

Mountain Stage

Birds Of Chicago On Mountain Stage

Birds Of Chicago On Mountain Stage

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Chicago's J.T. Nero and Toronto's Allison Russell were both successful songwriters prior to discovering their undeniable chemistry. They combined their efforts to form Birds of Chicago in 2012, with their debut self-titled release garnering immediate praise.

Charmed by their lyrics and close-knit harmonies, tripled up here by accompanying guitarist and vocalist Anthony da Costa, Mountain Stage host Larry Groce couldn't wait to invite the duo back for a second appearance with songs from the duo's 2016, Joe Henry-produced record Real Midnight.

You'll hear Russell playing clarient during "Remember Wild Horses," coupled with acoustic guitar from Nero and the light, atmospheric electric tones provided by da Costa.

Birds of Chicago released an EP called American Flowers in November 2017, and they dedicate the heartfelt, epic title track that closes this set to influential Oklahoma songwriter Jimmy LaFave, a frequent and favorite guest of Mountain Stage.

In May 2018, the band released their newest effort Love In Wartime, co-produced by Nero and North Mississippi Allstars' Luther Dickinson. The band celebrated with a tour of Europe, Netherlands, Belgium, Ireland and the U.K. followed by a run of summer festivals. More tour dates are planned for the fall.

SET LIST:

"Super Lover"

"Remember Wild Horses"

"Barley"

"American Flowers"

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