Bluff The Listener Our panelists read three stories about a superfan who went overboard and wound up in trouble with the police, only one of which is true.
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Bluff The Listener

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Bluff The Listener

Bluff The Listener

Bluff The Listener

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Our panelists read three stories about a superfan who went overboard and wound up in trouble with the police, only one of which is true.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now...

(CHEERING)

SAGAL: Right now, it's time for the WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME Bluff The Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play our game on the air. Hi, you are on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

JOHN TYSONS: Oh, my gosh, this is actually Peter Sagal?

SAGAL: It is.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, who is - where are you calling from?

TYSONS: My name is John Tysons. My friends call me J.J. (ph) and I'm in Kitty Hawk, N.C.

SAGAL: Kitty Hawk. What do you do there, J.J.?

TYSONS: So I just finished up an internship writing questions for a game show. And right now, I'm working as a waiter hoping to find a game show job.

SAGAL: Wow.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Well, J.J., we'll see what we can do to help you out, but in the meantime, you're going to play our game in which you must try to tell truth from fiction. Bill, what is J.J.'s topic?

BILL KURTIS: I'm your No. 1 fan.

SAGAL: We've all gone through that phase in our lives where we go just crazy for a band or an athlete or Steve Inskeep. This week, we read about a super fan who went overboard and wound up in legal trouble. Choose the true story and you'll win our prize - the voice of your choice from this show. Are you ready to play?

TYSONS: Absolutely.

SAGAL: Here we go. Let's first hear from Alonzo Bodden.

ALONZO BODDEN: Kevin Cayton had a problem. He had a weekend vacation scheduled in the famous tourist trap that is known as the Wisconsin Dells, but that wasn't the problem. The problem was that he's a huge Arizona Wildcats basketball fan, and there was no place to watch the game in the Wisconsin Dells, not even Buffalo Phil's Pizza & Grille, which is under the same roof as Knuckleheads Bowling and Trampoline Park.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Wisconsin is Big Ten territory, not Pac 12. So Kevin did what any true Wildcat fan would do. He pretended to be a Buffalo Phil's employee, and he repeatedly called the restaurant's cable provider to upgrade their TV sports package to include Pac 12 games. Kevin enjoyed his meals at the Buffalo Phil's, which, by the way, are delivered by a toy train, and the Wildcat games. And he would have gotten away with it if the restaurant owner hadn't noticed a big increase in his cable bill and called the cops. You know how the cable company customer service line always says these calls may be recorded? Well, it turns out, they are.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Police listened to the tapes of a man calling himself Pat Barkley calling in to order the upgraded package. And at one point during the call, Pat responds to someone in the room saying, hey, it's me, Kevin.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Kevin Cayton was arrested at his place of work, a car dealership in Illinois, and he's been charged with felony identity theft and faces up to 12 years in prison, which is kind of ironic as he's a Pac 12 fan.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: A guy gets in trouble...

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: ...For pretending to be an employee of a restaurant he's stuck at and ordering a cable package so he could watch the game he wants. Your next story of a fan going too far comes from Adam Burke.

ADAM BURKE: K-pop, the South Korean music sensation consisting of highly successful and highly manufactured male and female pop groups, attracts thousands of adoring fans throughout the South Pacific and beyond. But for one superfan, Kai Jo Nakamura (ph), a 31-year-old accountant from Japan, watching his favorite combo from the arena floor wasn't enough. When the popular troupe Bisan SuperFire (ph) swung through the Osaka-jo arena, Kai Jo saw his chance to get up close and personal with his idols. Nakamura laid low, and then, once the show started, he sprung into action. There's 13 members in the group, said SuperFire lead singer Day Sun Wo (ph), so when there's an extra person onstage, you don't really notice it at first.

(LAUGHTER)

BURKE: Helping Nakamura in his deception was that he had studied the band's fashion sense and dance moves closely. I mean, despite the fact he's quite a bit older than us, he really looked like a part of the group, said Jai Hot 90 (ph), one of the band's four rappers. Arena security didn't notice the extra body until three songs in when each member give themselves a shout-out. I was like, who the hell is Kai Nak (ph), said Hot 90. Nakamura is currently in custody awaiting trial on charges of trespassing and identity theft but says he is already planning a tour of his own upon release.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: A K-pop fan successfully impersonates a member of the Bisan SuperFire boy band. Your next story comes from Roxanne Roberts.

ROXANNE ROBERTS: The decision to eliminate swimsuits from the Miss America pageant has been controversial, which is why chairman Gretchen Carlson, a former Miss America herself, agreed to speak to the Georgia pageant directors association last month. Carlson planned to give a short speech about her decision but realized that might not happen when the chartered boat they were on left the dock. Instead, she was asked to watch a video presentation about the history of the pageant and swimsuits, starting with Atlantic City's boardwalk, covering every single year since. The 78 directors present then paraded down a makeshift runway wearing vintage swimsuits.

Quote - "we wanted her to understand how important this is to the pageant," said Cheryl Hadlee (ph), president of the association. "Frankly, we were surprised by Gretchen's reaction." Carlson's reaction - file a complaint with the Atlanta police claiming she was held captive against her will for more than three hours. Hadlee has been charged with second-degree kidnapping reports The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Hadlee says she still plans to be in Atlantic City for the pageant on September 9. Quote - "I wouldn't miss it for the world," she told the paper, "unless I'm in jail."

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: So a superfan of something got in trouble with the law. Was it from Alonzo Bodden, a Wildcats basketball fan who illegally impersonated a bar employee just to upgrade their cable package so he could watch the game; from Adam Burke, a big fan of a K-pop boy band who brilliantly impersonated the band onstage; or from Roxanne Roberts, how Gretchen Carlson was stuck on a boat with an enthusiastic swimsuit pageant fan as they tried to convince her to change her mind? Which of these was the real story of a superfan in the news?

TYSONS: OK. Let's go with A. Let's do A.

SAGAL: A - your choice is A. All right. Your choice is A, Alonzo's story of the guy who illegally ordered up the cable package. Well, to bring you the correct answer, we spoke to someone familiar with the true story.

KYLE KOSTER: He was posed as a restaurant employee and called the cable company and...

(CHEERING)

SAGAL: That was Kyle Koster from The Big Lead talking about the man who hijacked a restaurant's cable account and now faces a big 12 in jail. Congratulations, J.J. It was Alonzo telling the truth.

(CHEERING)

SAGAL: You've earned a point for him.

TYSONS: Thank you so much.

SAGAL: You've won our prize - the voice of anyone from our show on your voicemail. Congratulations, J.J.

TYSONS: Thank you, Mr. Sagal. Thank you.

SAGAL: Thank you, J.J. Take care.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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