Did Government Paperwork Really Weigh Down Airliner? An American Airlines flight was about to take off from Reagan National Airport when the pilot announced that the plane was overweight, and that they had to offload 1,400 pounds of documents.
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Did Government Paperwork Really Weigh Down Airliner?

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Did Government Paperwork Really Weigh Down Airliner?

Did Government Paperwork Really Weigh Down Airliner?

Did Government Paperwork Really Weigh Down Airliner?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636998703/636998704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An American Airlines flight was about to take off from Reagan National Airport when the pilot announced that the plane was overweight, and that they had to offload 1,400 pounds of documents.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Washington, D.C., is rife with bureaucracy. You know what comes along with that? Documents written on paper, lots and lots of paper, which can really weigh you down - or your airplane. An American Airlines flight was about to take off from D.C. when the pilot announced that the plane was overweight, and they had to offload 1,400 pounds of government documents. An airport spokesman says the pilot may have been kidding, but the metaphor, quite frankly, is too good to pass up. It's MORNING EDITION.

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