Weekly Wrap: "This Or That." It's Friday: Sam's in a material world with NPR correspondent Elise Hu (@elisewho) and Morning Edition host David Greene (@nprgreene). They're talking about North and South Korea, freedom of the press, Twitter, and the Queen of Soul. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.
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Weekly Wrap: "This Or That."

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Weekly Wrap: "This Or That."

Weekly Wrap: "This Or That."

Weekly Wrap: "This Or That."

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/639635628/639659337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

American musician Aretha Franklin performs on stage at the Park West Auditorium, Chicago, Illinois, March 23, 1992. Paul Natkin/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Natkin/Getty Images

American musician Aretha Franklin performs on stage at the Park West Auditorium, Chicago, Illinois, March 23, 1992.

Paul Natkin/Getty Images

It's Friday. Sam is celebrating his birthday (34, ready for more!) with his buddies Elise Hu "fresh off the plane" from Seoul, where she was a foreign correspondent for NPR, and David Greene, host of NPR's Morning Edition and Up First.

This week, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in announced another summit in Pyongyang in September, where U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Chinese President Xi Jinping will also attend. It could be where they finally sign a peace treaty that would officially end the Korean War. Three years after the war began in 1950, the fighting stopped in an armistice, but North and South Korea have "officially" been at war ever since. Back in April, a summit between the two leaders ended in an agreement to finally come up with a formal peace treaty to end the Korean War.

Also this week, President Trump attacked the media on Twitter, and hundreds of media outlets responded with simultanoues editorials denouncing Trump's attack and defending independent journalism. The effort began with the Boston Globe, which called upon other media outlets to "address this fundamental threat in their own words."

Also this week, as Twitter banned alt-right provocateur Alex Jones for seven days, CEO Jack Dorsey is on press tour, sharing ideas about his vision for the company and ways it might change. The Jones controversy is part of an ongoing debate about media platforms, free speech, and hate speech. Sam says, "we can't decide if they are completely private companies that can do whatever they want, or de facto public squares that have a higher moral obligation to serve the public."

Elsewhere in the show, 2018 has delivered some disappointing pop music. Sam and NPR Music critic Ann Powers have ideas about why — namely, that streaming music services like Spotify are changing how songs and albums are written and consumed. Specifically, young rappers are leading a trend of so-called "Soundcloud rap."

Ann also points us to sixteen year-old Billie Eilish's song "bitchesbrokenhearts" as an example of "lean back music" — music that seems to be made not for hooks or melodies, but for a mood-specific playlist you can stream in the background.

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Speaking of music, we highlight the "Queen of Soul" with one of her '80s bops, and we take a look at some of her moments of shade.

Plus, our conversation about public urinals in Paris reminded Elise of her brush with female urinals in her series Elise Tries.

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