Catholics Face Their Faith After Another Sex Abuse Scandal Pope Francis has apologized for "grave errors" in the Catholic church, after a sweeping grand jury report implicated hundreds of priests in the abuse of more than 1,000 children in Pennsylvania.

We talk about how the report has rocked the church with a practicing priest, and with a former priest who left the faith after he was abused himself.

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Catholics Face Their Faith After Another Sex Abuse Scandal

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Catholics Face Their Faith After Another Sex Abuse Scandal

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Catholics Face Their Faith After Another Sex Abuse Scandal

Catholics Face Their Faith After Another Sex Abuse Scandal

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PITTSBURGH, PA - AUGUST 15: Father Kris Stubna walks to the sanctuary following a mass to celebrate the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary at St Paul Cathedral, the mother church of the Pittsburgh Diocese on August 15, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Pittsburgh Diocese was rocked by revelations of abuse by priests the day before on August 14, 2018.(Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images) Jeff Swensen/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

PITTSBURGH, PA - AUGUST 15: Father Kris Stubna walks to the sanctuary following a mass to celebrate the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary at St Paul Cathedral, the mother church of the Pittsburgh Diocese on August 15, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Pittsburgh Diocese was rocked by revelations of abuse by priests the day before on August 14, 2018.(Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

On Monday, Pope Francis condemned the sexual abuse of children by members of the Catholic clergy. The unprecedented 2,000-word letter came out about a week after a grand jury report that implicated hundreds of priests in the abuse of more than a thousand children in Pennsylvania.

The pontiff wrote: "We showed no care for the little ones; we abandoned them [...] It is essential that we, as a Church, be able to acknowledge and condemn, with sorrow and shame, the atrocities perpetrated by consecrated persons, clerics, and all those entrusted with the mission of watching over and caring for those most vulnerable." You can read the full letter here.

He also referenced the story of Mary, and Jesus on the cross. When Jesus was being crucified, the Bible says that his mother stood by his side.

So why has the Church failed to stand fully with sexual abuse victims in their pain ... and is it too late for the Church to change?

We explored that question with a practicing priest, a Boston prosecutor and a former priest who left the clergy after being abused himself.