Wildfires In Canada Send Unwelcome Smoke Into The U.S. Some residents of Spokane, Wash., want to send the smoke back. They've asked every resident to put five fans on the roof — enough, they say, to blow the smoke back to Canada.
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Wildfires In Canada Send Unwelcome Smoke Into The U.S.

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Wildfires In Canada Send Unwelcome Smoke Into The U.S.

Wildfires In Canada Send Unwelcome Smoke Into The U.S.

Wildfires In Canada Send Unwelcome Smoke Into The U.S.

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Some residents of Spokane, Wash., want to send the smoke back. They've asked every resident to put five fans on the roof — enough, they say, to blow the smoke back to Canada.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Wildfires in Canada have been sending smoke into the U.S., and residents of Spokane, Wash., want to send the smoke back. A group is asking every resident to put five fans on the roof - enough, they say, to blow the smoke back to Canada. The BBC reports this campaign probably won't work. Actually, organizers are using it more to get information out about relief efforts in Canada, so they're not just blowing smoke. I know. The pun is not perfect, but I had to. It's MORNING EDITION.

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