Weekly Wrap: "Lying In Wait." It's Friday: Sam's feeling like a rockstar with New York Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson (@itscaitlinhd) and host of 'The News' from BuzzFeed, Julia Furlan (@juliastmi). They're discussing Michael Cohen, family separation, and another #MeToo story, but one with the usual gender roles reversed, plus a call to a Catholic mother processing the recent report of sexual abuse and cover ups in the church. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.
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Weekly Wrap: "Lying In Wait."

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Weekly Wrap: "Lying In Wait."

Weekly Wrap: "Lying In Wait."

Weekly Wrap: "Lying In Wait."

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/641643558/641729206" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

It's Friday. Sam is looking back at the week of news from New York this week with the help of Julia Furlan, host of Buzzfeed's podcast, "The News," and Caitlin Dickerson, immigration reporter for the New York Times.

Michael Cohen, center, leaves Federal court, Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, in New York. Cohen, has pleaded guilty to charges including campaign finance fraud stemming from hush money payments to porn actress Stormy Daniels and ex-Playboy model Karen McDougal. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Michael Cohen, center, leaves Federal court, Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, in New York. Cohen, has pleaded guilty to charges including campaign finance fraud stemming from hush money payments to porn actress Stormy Daniels and ex-Playboy model Karen McDougal.

Mary Altaffer/AP

Two months after a federal judge in San Diego ordered the Trump administration to reunify the families that had been separated under the "zero tolerance" policy, several hundred kids have yet to be reunited. In his ruling, Judge Dana M. Sabraw said that the facts "portray reactive governance responses to address a chaotic circumstance of the Government's own making." While the zero tolerance policy was in place, there were no protocols put in place for keeping track of families that were separated so that they could be reunited.

After the ruling, the government deemed hundreds of children ineligible for reunification for a variety of reasons, including cases where the parents had already been deported out of the U.S. or where parents had waived their rights to be reunited with their kids. A week after missing its deadline for reuniting families, the Justice Department released a statement suggesting the American Civil Liberties Union use its resources to reunite them.

President Trump's former personal lawyer Michael Cohen and his former campaign manager Paul Manafort are facing jail time. And although, as Sam points out, this is "some Watergate-level stuff," top Democrats are warning their fellow lawmakers, "don't use the word 'impeachment.'" The logic is, talking about impeachment makes Democrats look radical ahead of the midterms, which is why Democrats are keeping quiet while Republicans are using it a lot--trying to motivate their voters to turn out in November. Politico reports that a House Democrat said, "The voters don't want to talk about impeachment right now. ... You don't want to poke the bear in a way that he's able to come back even stronger."

Sam's three words are "lying in wait." Liberal groups are waiting to pounce should the president act on a drastic decision like firing Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Plans are in place to organize marches, reach out to sympathetic Republicans, and preserve the documents that are part of Mueller's investigation.

The actress Asia Argento has been at the forefront of the MeToo movement. In a speech at the Cannes Film Festival in May, she called the festival Harvey Weintstein's "hunting ground." Now, actor Jimmy Bennett has accused Argento of sexually abusing him while he was a minor in California, where the legal age of consent is 18. The story has left people grappling with the fact that a woman and a fellow victim can also be a perpetrator of sexual violence.

As Sam, Julia, and Caitlin run through public reactions, they fix on this headline from the New York Times: Asia Argento Proves, Once Again, That Women Are Human Beings. Julia observes that sexual assault is not a part of being "human" in the same way that an occasional white lie is. But Julia says this one reverse gender sexual assault situation does NOT change the MeToo movement.

Plus, goats make a debut on the New York Subway tracks.