Life With Lyme Disease : 1A Ever been bitten by a tick? Maybe you've pulled one off of your pet? The bacteria in that tick could lead to Lyme disease, which has spread to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. What kind of research is available on Lyme disease? How do you treat it? Or better, how do you prevent it in the first place?

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Life With Lyme Disease

Life With Lyme Disease

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A tick whose bite can transmit the Lyme disease. BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images

A tick whose bite can transmit the Lyme disease.

BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images

Ever been bitten by a tick? Maybe you've pulled on off of your pet?

The bacteria in that tick could lead to Lyme disease, which has spread to all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Documented cases of the disease are on the rise. If it's detected and diagnosed early enough, Lyme disease can be easy to treat and track. "Public-health officials say that a few weeks of antibiotic treatment will almost always wipe out the infection, and that relapses are rare," says one 2013 article in The New Yorker. But many cases of Lyme disease go unreported, which complicates things.

And it's expensive. "In 2015, researchers from Johns Hopkins estimated that Lyme disease costs the U.S. health care system up to $1.3 billion a year," according to The Tampa Bay Times.

What kind of research is available on Lyme disease? How do you treat it? Or better, how do you prevent it in the first place?