Researchers At Saint Andrews University Study Gender Bias In Monkeys Researchers found female vervet monkeys have closer social bonds, and if one of them finds a better way to get food, others pay attention. Male monkeys are less discriminating in whom they learn from.

Researchers At Saint Andrews University Study Gender Bias In Monkeys

Researchers At Saint Andrews University Study Gender Bias In Monkeys

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Researchers found female vervet monkeys have closer social bonds, and if one of them finds a better way to get food, others pay attention. Male monkeys are less discriminating in whom they learn from.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Researchers say they found gender bias in monkeys. St. Andrews University studied how monkeys learn from each other and found female monkeys less likely to learn from males. The females have closer social bonds. And if one finds a better way to get food, others pay attention. Male monkeys move around more, form weaker social bonds. And even if the males do stumble on useful information, females don't trust them. It's MORNING EDITION.

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