Predictions Our panelists predict what will be the title of the next anonymous op-ed in the New York Times.
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Predictions

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Predictions

Predictions

Predictions

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Our panelists predict what will be the title of the next anonymous op-ed in the New York Times.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the next anonymous op-ed that we will wake up to see in The New York Times? Maeve Higgins.

MAEVE HIGGINS: We should all be vegan. I know that because I'm three bees and a lamb.

(LAUGHTER)

HIGGINS: But, you see, you don't know which three bees and which lamb.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: This is not getting any clearer.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Adam Burke.

ADAM BURKE: "I Am Anonymous" - a essay by someone claiming to be Anonymous, the guy who came up with those sayings, proverbs and epigrams...

(LAUGHTER)

BURKE: ...You see on motivational posters. And he was demanding he gets a royalty every - next time you say a stitch in time saves nine.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Helen Hong.

HELEN HONG: A letter written by an anonymous service dog saying it's actually OK to pet us.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

BILL KURTIS: Well, if any of that happens, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

SAGAL: Thank you, Bill Kurtis. Thanks also to Helen Hong, Adam Burke, and Maeve Higgins for a fabulous debut on our show. Thanks to all of you for listening. I am Peter Sagal. We'll see you next week.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

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