Hashtag Reminds Us Why Sexual Crimes Are Often Unreported This week a new hashtag arose:#WhyIDidntReport. It follows President Trump's response to the sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. NPR's Scott Simon has the story.
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Hashtag Reminds Us Why Sexual Crimes Are Often Unreported

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Hashtag Reminds Us Why Sexual Crimes Are Often Unreported

Hashtag Reminds Us Why Sexual Crimes Are Often Unreported

Hashtag Reminds Us Why Sexual Crimes Are Often Unreported

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/650698303/650698304" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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This week a new hashtag arose:#WhyIDidntReport. It follows President Trump's response to the sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. NPR's Scott Simon has the story.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

President Trump, of course, dismissed the allegations of sexual assault against Brett Kavanaugh. And this week, he tweeted, I have no doubt, if the attack on Dr. Ford was as bad as she says, charges would have been immediately filed with local law enforcement authorities by either her or her loving parents. Experts, law enforcement officials and families have learned there are many reasons why people who are victims of rape and sexual assault do not report these incidents at the time or even years later. The hashtag #WhyIDidntReport began to trend on Twitter after the president made his comment - story after story to remind us why these crimes are so often unreported. Here are the voices of some of the people who tweeted their stories.

AMANDA STAFFORD: By the time I finally admitted to myself what he had done, I thought it was too late - #WhyIDidntReport.

CHANTERELLE DAVIS: Because I didn't even realize until weeks afterwards, in a mandatory workshop about consent and sexual assault with my sorority, that what had happened to me was rape and there was a reason I felt so gross and awful about the experience.

KELLY NOVAK: Age 8 - because I thought what he was doing was really an accident. Age 13 - because the next morning, I knew something bad happened, but I had blocked it out and was disoriented. Age 34 - because I knew the criminal justice system would retraumatize me - #WhyIDidntReport.

NATALIE VARNER BUSKO: I said no over and over. I was crying. He knew what he did. He even apologized the next day. I was scared. I thought I was alone.

NATALIE VARNER BUSKO AND ANDY BROWN: #WhyIDidntReport.

ANDY BROWN: I was just a kid, and he was my dad.

SIMON: That was Andy Brown. We also heard from Amanda Stafford, Chanterelle Davis, Kelly Novak and Natalie Varner Busko. Thank you to all who shared their stories with us.

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