#Girlbosses People may call Bruce Springsteen "The Boss," but high-powered women are the ones really in charge. In this musical parody, Springsteen songs are rewritten to be about women in the business world.
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#Girlbosses

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#Girlbosses

#Girlbosses

#Girlbosses

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Ask Me Another's house musician Jonathan Coulton leads a music parody game at the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York. Mike Katzif/NPR hide caption

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Mike Katzif/NPR

Ask Me Another's house musician Jonathan Coulton leads a music parody game at the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York.

Mike Katzif/NPR

People may call Bruce Springsteen "The Boss," but these high-powered women are the ones really in charge. In this musical parody, Springsteen songs are rewritten to be about notable women in the business world.

Heard on DeRay Mckesson: The Vest Is Yet To Come.