Panel Questions Three's Company; Mistaken Identity.
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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Three's Company; Mistaken Identity.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We're playing this week with Maz Jobrani, Alonzo Bodden and Jessi Klein. And here again is your host at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles, Calif., Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, everybody. In just a minute, Bill is your rhyme-or-die chick in our Listener Limerick Challenge.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAITWAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from this week's news. Maz, it's hard to do anything shocking in high fashion runways. But this week, a designer at Milan Fashion Week made headlines by sending models down the runway. And each of them had what?

MAZ JOBRANI: Oh, OK. Each of them had something that was shocking.

SAGAL: Yes - something you don't normally see.

JOBRANI: On a model.

SAGAL: On anybody.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I'll give you a hint. They weren't showing cleavage. They were showing cleavages.

JOBRANI: Cleavages?

SAGAL: Yes.

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE MEMBER: Three boobs.

JOBRANI: Udders?

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: How do you get...

SAGAL: I'm just going to say you got it because I don't want you to guess anymore.

JOBRANI: OK.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

JOBRANI: I'll keep going.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Each model had three boobs.

JOBRANI: Wow.

SAGAL: Yeah, which is really good news for triplets.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: An Italian fashion brand started by two brothers made a powerful statement about women last week on the catwalk. That statement - you should have more boobs.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Two models in their spring-summer line were sent down the runway with an extra prosthetic breast.

JOBRANI: Oh.

SAGAL: Yeah.

JOBRANI: I thought you were - mean real.

SAGAL: No.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: That's why I was going with the udder thing.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So they had, you know, these women with these sort of middle prosthetic breasts. And they had special clothing designed for that. And they all walk down with that sort of, you know, amazing, you know, stern, emotionless model face and a litter of puppies.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's insane. We have talked for years about the unrealistic body image in fashion, and somebody was like, maybe not unrealistic enough.

(LAUGHTER)

ALONZO BODDEN: I can see where - Jessi, I have to speak to you as a woman, where...

JESSI KLEIN: Thank you. Thank you for seeing me.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: ...Where you women just have to get tired of men. At what point do you, like, well, how can we go lower? I know - let's make a three-boobed woman - like this.

(LAUGHTER)

KLEIN: Yeah.

BODDEN: There's just - anything that will do - and it worked. Like, nobody stopped them. No...

KLEIN: Yeah.

BODDEN: ...Nobody was like, this isn't right.

SAGAL: No.

KLEIN: I'm picturing that there was probably, like, a female intern who tried to say it wasn't a great idea, and then someone mansplained to her why it was the best idea.

(LAUGHTER)

KLEIN: I don't know. Two already feels like a lot.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Jessi - I said this backstage, and it's absolutely true. This week, better to be black than a woman.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Jessi, a number of users of iPhones with facial recognition unlock say the technology doesn't work when they do what?

KLEIN: Is this so obvious?

SAGAL: Sort of kind of if you think about when you don't look your best.

KLEIN: In the morning.

SAGAL: Yes, when you wake up.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

KLEIN: It's hard for me to know because I - hashtag #flawless, you know?

SAGAL: Yeah, I understand. So what's apparently happening is, people are waking up. And they're grabbing their phones like we all do the minute you wake up. And they look at their phones to unlock it. And the phone goes, oh my God, how'd I go home with that person?

(LAUGHTER)

KLEIN: That is such a bummer.

SAGAL: Yeah, that's what's happening because, apparently, the facial I.D. does not recognize you when your hair's messed up - bedhead - or your face is puffy, and your breath smells.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And the iPhone won't unlock. It's like, those jello shots make you look bad and make my screen sticky, so stop.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Or, like, you pick up the phone, and it unlocks. And it says, yeah, I was dreaming I was Jon Hamm's phone.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Do you think his phone just shuts off periodically so he has to look at it again?

(LAUGHTER)

KLEIN: What a pain he is.

SAGAL: Yeah, instead of you asking - instead of hey, Siri, it's like, hey, Jon.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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