The State We're In: Gun Legislation It's been one year since the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history. How have state governments responded to mass shootings, activism and the Second Amendment?

This is the first installment of our series called "The State We're In," where we'll explore the bills and ballot initiatives dominating debate in state capitals.

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The State We're In: Gun Legislation

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The State We're In: Gun Legislation

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The State We're In: Gun Legislation

The State We're In: Gun Legislation

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653399343/653414128" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Today marks one year since the mass shooting in Las Vegas at an open-air country music festival that left 58 dead and hundreds wounded. It was the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history.

After, many called for more gun control — particularly on bump stocks. Some states did pass bump-stock legislation, but other major gun restrictions went nowhere.

But this year, something shifted after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where a gunman walked into the school and killed 17 students and staff.

It sparked a movement led by student survivors, and states around the nation started restricting gun access — including some states with Republican governors.

In the first installment of our new series called "The State We're In," we discuss the latest in state-wide gun legislation and proposals.