A Sisterhood Of Sexual Assault Survivors Are Sharing Stories, Shouting Back : 1A Christine Blasey Ford's testimony brought to the surface difficult memories. And sexual assault survivors who had never shared publicly what happened to them starting doing so — at home, on social media and at workplaces. How should we cope with this moment of collective trauma?

You'll also hear the voices of several of our producers as they share their stories.

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A Sisterhood Of Sexual Assault Survivors Are Sharing Stories, Shouting Back

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A Sisterhood Of Sexual Assault Survivors Are Sharing Stories, Shouting Back

1A

A Sisterhood Of Sexual Assault Survivors Are Sharing Stories, Shouting Back

A Sisterhood Of Sexual Assault Survivors Are Sharing Stories, Shouting Back

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653706129/653716643" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

When Christine Blasey Ford testified before Congress last Thursday, women across the country, and world, were listening. They were also talking.

Blasey Ford's testimony brought to the surface difficult memories. And sexual assault survivors who had never shared publicly what happened to them starting doing so — at home, on social media and at workplaces.

From The Washington Post:

"Women across the political spectrum called in to C-SPAN during hearing breaks to talk about their experiences being assaulted. The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network reported a 201 percent spike in calls Thursday as well as 'unprecedented wait times' for its online chat.

The Crisis Text Line, which provides crisis intervention, saw the numbers of people reaching out with stories of sexual abuse double in October 2017, when the #MeToo movement began. The organization says it's the highest number of sexual abuse reports they have seen since the since the 2016 election."

We explore this moment of reckoning, not just for the Supreme Court and partisan politics, but how breaking the silence could change our society and our culture. How should we cope with this moment of collective trauma?