Residents In Gilbert, Minn., Call Police On Drunk Birds Gilbert Police Chief Ty Techar says an early frost means the birds have been "getting a little more 'tipsy' than normal" on fermented berries.
NPR logo

Residents In Gilbert, Minn., Call Police On Drunk Birds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/654670132/654670133" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Residents In Gilbert, Minn., Call Police On Drunk Birds

Residents In Gilbert, Minn., Call Police On Drunk Birds

Residents In Gilbert, Minn., Call Police On Drunk Birds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/654670132/654670133" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gilbert Police Chief Ty Techar says an early frost means the birds have been "getting a little more 'tipsy' than normal" on fermented berries.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Gilbert, Minn., has a drinking problem. Police say intoxicated residents have been acting confused and flying into windows, a particular risk for birds. Yes, The Washington Post writes that a frost caused berries in Gilbert to ferment earlier than usual, and berry-eating birds have been getting drunk. One person wrote on the police department's Facebook page, there goes the chance of any bird from northern Minnesota ever being on the Supreme Court.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.