For 30 Years, Michigan Man Has Been Using Meteorite As A Doorstop A recent check determined that the rock that weighed more than 22 pounds was the sixth-largest meteorite found in Michigan, and could be worth as much as $1,000.00.
NPR logo

For 30 Years, Michigan Man Has Been Using Meteorite As A Doorstop

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/655528943/655528944" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
For 30 Years, Michigan Man Has Been Using Meteorite As A Doorstop

For 30 Years, Michigan Man Has Been Using Meteorite As A Doorstop

For 30 Years, Michigan Man Has Been Using Meteorite As A Doorstop

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/655528943/655528944" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A recent check determined that the rock that weighed more than 22 pounds was the sixth-largest meteorite found in Michigan, and could be worth as much as $1,000.00.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Mona Sirbescu is a geology professor at Central Michigan University. People often bring her rocks and ask if they're meteorites. Usually her answer is no. But recently, a man came to her office with a 22-plus-pound rock just to check. Turns out it's the sixth-largest recorded meteorite found in Michigan, worth as much as $100,000. The man said that for 30 years, he'd been using it as a doorstop. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.