Officials At The U.S. Embassy In Canberra Apologize For Email Invitation It looked like an invitation to a meeting in Australia but attached was a photo of a cat reclining back, holding a plate of chocolate chip cookies, wearing a blue cookie monster outfit.
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Officials At The U.S. Embassy In Canberra Apologize For Email Invitation

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Officials At The U.S. Embassy In Canberra Apologize For Email Invitation

Officials At The U.S. Embassy In Canberra Apologize For Email Invitation

Officials At The U.S. Embassy In Canberra Apologize For Email Invitation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657724964/657724965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

It looked like an invitation to a meeting in Australia but attached was a photo of a cat reclining back, holding a plate of chocolate chip cookies, wearing a blue cookie monster outfit.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Rachel Martin. The U.S. Embassy in Australia sent a bizarre email the other day. It looked like an invitation to a meeting, complete with an RSVP link. Attached, though, was this photo of a cat reclining back, holding a plate of chocolate chip cookies, wearing a blue Cookie Monster costume. The caption beneath read, cat pajama jam. A U.S. official sent out an apology. And yes, the invitation was fake. But based on my Twitter feed, the world's craving for a cat pajama jam is very real. It's MORNING EDITION.

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