"I Started With A Million Dollar Loan." Taking Apart Trump's Taxes Earlier this month, The New York Times published a blockbuster investigation that showed President Donald Trump received more than $400 million from his father, New York City builder Fred Trump. The investigation also uncovered "instances of outright fraud" and other "dubious" tax schemes.

We talk with Susanne Craig and Russ Buettner about how they got the scoop.

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"I Started With A Million Dollar Loan." Taking Apart Trump's Taxes

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"I Started With A Million Dollar Loan." Taking Apart Trump's Taxes

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"I Started With A Million Dollar Loan." Taking Apart Trump's Taxes

"I Started With A Million Dollar Loan." Taking Apart Trump's Taxes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/660642593/660911551" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

U.S. President Donald Trump takes part in a roundtable discussion on tax reform at Bucky Dent Park in Hialeah, Florida on April 16, 2018. MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump takes part in a roundtable discussion on tax reform at Bucky Dent Park in Hialeah, Florida on April 16, 2018.

MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

Earlier this month, The New York Times published a blockbuster investigation that showed President Donald Trump received $413 million dollars (in today's money) from his father, New York City builder Fred Trump.

The investigation also uncovered "instances of outright fraud" and other "dubious" tax schemes. Padded receipts from purchases for Fred Trump's apartment buildings funneled money from Fred to his children at lower tax rates — and gave them an excuse to raise rents on those tenants.

The president declined many requests from media outlets to comment on the piece, which took more than a year to report.

A lawyer for President Trump, Charles Harder, said, "The New York Times' allegations of fraud and tax evasion are 100% false, and highly defamatory. There was no fraud or tax evasion by anyone. The facts upon which the Times bases its false allegations are extremely inaccurate."

The story dropped in the same week as now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, which might be why it didn't make a bigger splash.

We talk with Susanne Craig and Russ Buettner, two of the reporters who spent months on this story.

How did they get the scoop when the president has been famously reticent to release his tax returns? What are the potential consequences for Trump?