Jonah Hill Hill always wanted to be a writer and director, but an unexpected complement in an acting class shifted him towards performing instead. He co-starred in 'The Wolf of Wall Street,' 'Superbad,' and 'Moneyball.' Now he's written and directed his first movie, 'Mid90s,' about a group of young skateboarders. He talks about toxic masculinity, self-acceptance, and his experience directing for the first time.

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Let The People See,' the story of Emmett Till.
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Jonah Hill

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Jonah Hill

Jonah Hill

Jonah Hill

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662131757/662208523" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Hill always wanted to be a writer and director, but an unexpected complement in an acting class shifted him towards performing instead. He co-starred in 'The Wolf of Wall Street,' 'Superbad,' and 'Moneyball.' Now he's written and directed his first movie, 'Mid90s,' about a group of young skateboarders. He talks about toxic masculinity, self-acceptance, and his experience directing for the first time.

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Let The People See,' the story of Emmett Till.