Kim Petras Goes Dark For Halloween With 'Turn Off The Light, Vol. 1' The latest release from the young pop singer, known for Barbie doll imagery and bubble-gum sounds, features spookier sonics and a cameo from Elvira.
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Kim Petras Goes Dark For Halloween With 'Turn Off The Light, Vol. 1'

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Kim Petras Goes Dark For Halloween With 'Turn Off The Light, Vol. 1'

Kim Petras Goes Dark For Halloween With 'Turn Off The Light, Vol. 1'

Kim Petras Goes Dark For Halloween With 'Turn Off The Light, Vol. 1'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662129014/662696840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kim Petras' Halloween mixtape, Turn Off The Light, Vol. 1, is out now. Thom Kerr/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Thom Kerr/Courtesy of the artist

Kim Petras' Halloween mixtape, Turn Off The Light, Vol. 1, is out now.

Thom Kerr/Courtesy of the artist

Kim Petras has built a reputation for Barbie doll imagery and bubble-gum pop sounds. So fans started to wonder what was going on when, about a month ago, the pop singer started posting strange images on on social media — creepy, dark self-portraits with dripping blood and blank eyes.

When the clock struck midnight on October 1, it all became clear. Petras dropped a surprise Halloween-themed mixtape called Turn Off the Light, Vol.1, featuring spooky sounds, macabre themes and a scene-stealing guest appearance from horror hostess Elvira.

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A longtime fan of horror movies and Halloween, Petras says she been itching to make a darker kind of pop record for years. "I think they can stand on their own," Petras says of the songs on Turn Off the Light. "That's important to me, as a fan of pop: I wanted them to be songs that you can listen to all year, but that fit into a Halloween-related context." Hear more from her conversation with NPR's Ari Shapiro at the audio link.