Secret Service Protects Estonia's President As She Runs U.S. Marathon The Secret Service protects U.S. presidents and also visiting heads of state. Estonia's President Kersti Kaljulaid was in the New York City Marathon — two agents had to run with her.
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Secret Service Protects Estonia's President As She Runs U.S. Marathon

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Secret Service Protects Estonia's President As She Runs U.S. Marathon

Secret Service Protects Estonia's President As She Runs U.S. Marathon

Secret Service Protects Estonia's President As She Runs U.S. Marathon

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/664280735/664280736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The Secret Service protects U.S. presidents and also visiting heads of state. Estonia's President Kersti Kaljulaid was in the New York City Marathon — two agents had to run with her.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Secret Service protects U.S. presidents but also visiting heads of state. So when the president of Estonia, Kersti Kaljulaid, was here, they were on duty. You know, stick close during her meetings, her meals. Oh, and her 26-mile run. President Kaljulaid was in the New York City Marathon so two agents had to run alongside her. They seemed undaunted. One agent, already training for another marathon, said, I just added 10 miles to my training day. It's MORNING EDITION.

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