40 Years Later, What We Learned From Jonestown On Nov. 18, 1978, an itinerant preacher, faith healer and civil rights activist named the Rev. Jim Jones led more than 900 of his followers to kill themselves by drinking cyanide-laced Flavor Aid at their Jonestown settlement in the jungle of Guyana. 40 years later, questions still linger regarding the Jonestown massacre and the man who inspired it. Journalist Jeff Guinn details how Jones captivated his followers in the book 'The Road to Jonestown.'

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the AMC spy thriller series 'Little Drummer Girl.'
NPR logo

40 Years Later, What We Learned From Jonestown

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668618558/668742773" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
40 Years Later, What We Learned From Jonestown

40 Years Later, What We Learned From Jonestown

40 Years Later, What We Learned From Jonestown

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668618558/668742773" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

On Nov. 18, 1978, an itinerant preacher, faith healer and civil rights activist named the Rev. Jim Jones led more than 900 of his followers to kill themselves by drinking cyanide-laced Flavor Aid at their Jonestown settlement in the jungle of Guyana. 40 years later, questions still linger regarding the Jonestown massacre and the man who inspired it. Journalist Jeff Guinn details how Jones captivated his followers in the book 'The Road to Jonestown.'

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the AMC spy thriller series 'Little Drummer Girl.'