Man Invites Strangers To Thanksgiving Dinner So He Won't Be Alone More than 30 years ago, Scott Macaulay decided he never wanted to be alone on Thanksgiving. Each year he puts an ad in his local paper in Massachusetts and has people call to RSVP.
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Man Invites Strangers To Thanksgiving Dinner So He Won't Be Alone

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Man Invites Strangers To Thanksgiving Dinner So He Won't Be Alone

Man Invites Strangers To Thanksgiving Dinner So He Won't Be Alone

Man Invites Strangers To Thanksgiving Dinner So He Won't Be Alone

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More than 30 years ago, Scott Macaulay decided he never wanted to be alone on Thanksgiving. Each year he puts an ad in his local paper in Massachusetts and has people call to RSVP.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Scott Macaulay decided decades ago that he never wanted to be alone on Thanksgiving and that other people with complicated families probably felt that way, too. So this year, he will host a free Thanksgiving feast, and anyone can come. He's done the same thing for the last 32 years. He puts an ad in his local paper and has people call to RSVP. He told The Washington Post, reservations usually come in at the last minute because everyone's waiting for a better offer. But his dinner sounds just about perfect to us. It's MORNING EDITION.

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