Women In Jazz? For Artemis, It's Bigger Than A Cause The "all-female" framework is both integral to the jazz supergroup Artemis and somehow beside the point.

Jazz supergroup Artemis performs at the Newport Jazz Festival. Jonathan Chimene/WGBO hide caption

toggle caption
Jonathan Chimene/WGBO

Jazz supergroup Artemis performs at the Newport Jazz Festival.

Jonathan Chimene/WGBO

Jazz Night In America: The Radio Program

Women In Jazz? For Artemis, It's Bigger Than A CauseWBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

Women In Jazz? For Artemis, It's Bigger Than A Cause

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/669962702/670039083" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Renee Rosnes has seen her share of jazz supergroups. Thirty years ago, she held down the piano chair with Out of the Blue, a youthful all-star crew formed by Blue Note Records. She was a charter member of the SFJAZZ Collective. So she had a wealth of experience to draw from when she recently formed a supergroup of her own.

Reaching across generations and nationalities, Rosnes enlisted some of the most accomplished artists on the scene: Trumpeter Ingrid Jensen, clarinetist Anat Cohen, tenor saxophonist Melissa Aldana, drummer Allison Miller, bassist Noriko Ueda and vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant. This impressive cohort went on its first tour under the banner of International Women's Day, after which it acquired a new name: Artemis, after the Greek goddess of the hunt.

Jazz Night in America caught up with Artemis at the 2018 Newport Jazz Festival, where the band's commanding set included both originals (like Rosnes' "Galapagos") and jazz standards (like Thelonious Monk's "Brilliant Corners"). And we sat in on a conversation between Cohen, Jensen and journalist Natalie Weiner, which touched on both the magical qualities of the group and some of the challenges its members have faced as female musicians in what's still a male-dominated field.

"I don't think we're there yet, where somebody would look at a group like Artemis and just think of it as a band without actually having to mention, 'Oh, it's an all-woman band,' or 'It's an all-female band,'" Rosnes says. But listen to the music in this show and you'll understand how a project like this is making a difference — and plenty of noise, in the best possible way.

[+] read more[-] less

More From Jazz Night In America: The Radio Program

This episode of Jazz Night in America features tenor saxophonist Charles Lloyd. Dorothy Darr/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Dorothy Darr/Courtesy of the artist

At 80, Saxophonist Charles Lloyd Finds Enlightenment in the Groove

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

In this episode of Jazz Night in America, we get a taste of Lloyd's collaboration with Lucinda Williams, along with choice moments from his recent appearances at Lincoln Center.

At 80, Saxophonist Charles Lloyd Finds Enlightenment in the Groove

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/673799006/674218582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Nico van der Stam/Octave Music

Into the Vault: Erroll Garner Uncovered

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

Take an essential and unprecedented glimpse into the music and life of the groundbreaking pianist-composer.

Into the Vault: Erroll Garner Uncovered

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656189856/656604367" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Bassist Dave Holland and tabla player Zakir Hussain perform as part of Crosscurrents at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City. Lawrence Sumulong/Jazz at Lincoln Center hide caption

toggle caption Lawrence Sumulong/Jazz at Lincoln Center

Crosscurrents: Converging Jazz And Indian Classical Music

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

Explore the influence of Indian music on the jazz and rock scenes of the '60s with tabla virtuoso Zakir Hussain, prolific bassist Dave Holland and their international ensemble, Crosscurrents.

Carlos Henriquez in The Bronx. Lawrence Sumulong for Jazz at Lincoln Center hide caption

toggle caption Lawrence Sumulong for Jazz at Lincoln Center

Carlos Henriquez: The Bronx Pyramid

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

The bassist spends a lot of time in midtown Manhattan for his day job with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. But his roots, and the music he's made about them, are uptown.

Carlos Henriquez: The Bronx Pyramid

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476077535/476086613" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Harold Mabern Alan Nahigian/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Alan Nahigian/Courtesy of the artist

At The Helm: Harold Mabern, Stalwart Accompanist, At 82

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

Harold Mabern has been one of jazz's most consistent accompanists over the last 60 years. In this episode of Jazz Night in America, we explore some of that history with him.

At The Helm: Harold Mabern, Stalwart Accompanist, At 82

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/614517884/614520719" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Back To Top