The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Green Book' There have been a lot of fish-out-of-water buddy comedies at the movies over the years. But never quite like this.

Director Peter Farrelly takes on a true story with his latest film, "Green Book."

Is it a feel-good movie? Or yet another example of a black man's story being sacrificed to make a white man a hero?

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The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Green Book'

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The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Green Book'

1A

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Green Book'

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Green Book'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/670082442/670092851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

There have been a lot of fish-out-of-water buddy comedies at the movies over the years. But never quite like this.

Director Peter Farrelly takes on a true story with his latest film, "Green Book." It's named for the Negro Motorist's Green Book — a travel guide for black motorists.

"Green Book" follows a guy known as Tony Lip, played by Viggo Mortensen, who's a tough-talking Italian from the Bronx. Tony gets hired as the valet to Dr. Don Shirley, played by Mahershala Ali, a virtuosic black pianist touring the Jim Crow South.

They make for a very odd couple.

Is "Green Book" a feel-good movie, showing how people from different backgrounds can connect and grow? Or is it yet another example of a black man's story being sacrificed to make a white man a hero?

Spoiler alert: As always, we'll be getting into the details of the film, spoilers and all, so if you'd like to see the movie first, you should!