The Leaning Tower Of Pisa Is Leaning Less The tower in Italy tilted 13 feet toward the south. To stabilize it, work crews spent years removing earth beneath the north side. The tower has now started to measurably straighten.

The Leaning Tower Of Pisa Is Leaning Less

The Leaning Tower Of Pisa Is Leaning Less

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/670228551/670228552" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The tower in Italy tilted 13 feet toward the south. To stabilize it, work crews spent years removing earth beneath the north side. The tower has now started to measurably straighten.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. The Leaning Tower of Pisa is leaning less. The tower in Italy tilts 13 feet toward the south. So to stabilize it, work crews spent years removing earth beneath the north side. The tower has now started to measurably straighten. In recent years, it's moved 1.5 inches toward the vertical. Granted, that's not much, but they don't want it to move much more because it would hardly be the Leaning Tower if it didn't lean.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.