Connecticut Man Says Hash Brown Got Him Into Trouble With Police Ever notice McDonald's hash browns are shaped like a cell phone? Jason Stiber says he was charged with distracted driving. Police told local media that he was on his phone. Stiber says he was eating.
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Connecticut Man Says Hash Brown Got Him Into Trouble With Police

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Connecticut Man Says Hash Brown Got Him Into Trouble With Police

Connecticut Man Says Hash Brown Got Him Into Trouble With Police

Connecticut Man Says Hash Brown Got Him Into Trouble With Police

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/670752935/670752950" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ever notice McDonald's hash browns are shaped like a cell phone? Jason Stiber says he was charged with distracted driving. Police told local media that he was on his phone. Stiber says he was eating.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. You ever get breakfast at McDonald's and notice how their hash brown is sort of the shape and size of your phone? Well, Jason Stiber says this got him in trouble. He was pulled over in Connecticut and charged with distracted driving.

Police tell the Albany Times Union Stiver was on his phone. Stiber says, nope, just eating a hash brown. He's going to be in court in a couple weeks, he says, to fight for justice, or, at least for the right to eat breakfast inside your car. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

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