Think Your Dog Is Smart, That's Likely Not True A new study found that dogs are relatively ordinary when compared with dolphins, wolves, pigeons, or cats.
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Think Your Dog Is Smart, That's Likely Not True

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Think Your Dog Is Smart, That's Likely Not True

Think Your Dog Is Smart, That's Likely Not True

Think Your Dog Is Smart, That's Likely Not True

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/671799964/671799965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new study found that dogs are relatively ordinary when compared with dolphins, wolves, pigeons, or cats.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Your favorite dog may not be a genius after all. Scientific American asks why many of us think dogs are especially smart. People think dogs understand their words. A small survey once found most dog owners believe theirs to be above average - most - above average. But a study finds no canine exceptionalism. The review of scientific literature found dogs not notably smart compared with dolphins, wolves, pigeons - or cats.

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