6 Scientists Swallowed Legos To Show Parents How Safe It Is They downed the small head of Lego figures to see how long it would take for them to leave their bodies. On average, the scientists passed the Legos within 1.7 days with no pain or side effects.
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6 Scientists Swallowed Legos To Show Parents How Safe It Is

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6 Scientists Swallowed Legos To Show Parents How Safe It Is

6 Scientists Swallowed Legos To Show Parents How Safe It Is

6 Scientists Swallowed Legos To Show Parents How Safe It Is

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/672123857/672123858" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

They downed the small head of Lego figures to see how long it would take for them to leave their bodies. On average, the scientists passed the Legos within 1.7 days with no pain or side effects.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. If you've got young kids, you're always worried they'll put something crazy in their mouths, like the head of their favorite Darth Vader Lego guy. Six scientists in the U.K. and Australia wanted to allay parents' fears, so each of them swallowed the small head of a Lego figure to see how long it would take for it to leave their bodies. On average, the scientists passed the Legos within 1.7 days with no pain or side effects. They say the bottom line, so to speak - parents, you don't have to sweat the small stuff.

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