Sunday Puzzle: Familiar Phrases Weekend Edition's Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Puzzlemaster Will Shortz play a word game with KPBS listener Geoffrey Mayne of San Diego, Calif.
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Sunday Puzzle: Familiar Phrases

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Sunday Puzzle: Familiar Phrases

Sunday Puzzle: Familiar Phrases

Sunday Puzzle: Familiar Phrases

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Sunday Puzzle NPR hide caption

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Sunday Puzzle

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On-air challenge: Every answer today is a familiar three-word phrase or title in which the first and last words are the same. I'll give you the middle word (and a clue, if necessary). You tell me the phrase.

Ex. AFTER — Repeatedly --> TIME AFTER TIME

1. THINGS — Phrase suggesting priority

2. SWEET — What you say after returning from a long trip

3. AGAINST — Not give up despite impossible odds

4. SAY — Don't give up, there's always a possibility

5. BABY — Catchphrase said by Sarah Palin at the 2008 Republican National Convention

6. THOUSAND — The number of "Arabian Nights"

7. GLORIOUS — Song from "Oliver!" with the lyric "Just picture a great big steak / Fried, roasted, or stewed"

8. BLOODY — 1971 film with Glenda Jackson and Peter Finch

9. NOT — Faux apology

Last week's challenge: This puzzle also involves rhymes. It comes from listener James Matthews of Little Rock, Ark. Think of a common seven-letter word. Drop its second letter, and you'll get a six-letter word that does not rhyme with the first. Alternatively, you can drop the third letter from the seven-letter word to get a six-letter word that doesn't rhyme with either of the first two. Further, you can drop both the second and third letters from the seven-letter word to get a five-letter word that doesn't rhyme with any of the others. What words are these?

Challenge answer: Through --> though --> trough --> tough

Winner: KPBS listener Geoffrey Mayne of San Diego, California.

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Dominick Talvacchio of Chicago. Think of a word that can go before "table" to make a familiar phrase. Move the last letter to the front, and you'll have a word that can go after "table" to make a familiar phrase. What phrases are these?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, Dec. 13, at 3 p.m. ET.