Citi Bike's Better Angels How one bike-sharing company used behavioral economics to solve one of its most vexing problems.
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Citi Bike's Better Angels

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Citi Bike's Better Angels

Citi Bike's Better Angels

Citi Bike's Better Angels

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How one bike-sharing company used behavioral economics to solve one of its most vexing problems.

John Moore/Getty Images
Citi Bike users pedal through the streets of Manhattan. Some members of Generation Z, the younger generation following the millennials, are less inclined to own cars and lean more toward bike-sharing and ride-sharing services.
John Moore/Getty Images