The Truth About Carbs And Calories Carbs get a bad rap. Here's the science behind why eating too much starch isn't good for you — and smart tips to integrate more slow carbs into your diet.

Here's what to remember:
- Not all calories act the same in the body.
- Refined carbs quickly turn to sugar in your body.
- Focus instead on refined carbs that take longer to digest, like fruits, beans and whole grains.
- If you love breads and muffins, save them for the end of your meal.
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The Truth About Carbs And Calories

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The Truth About Carbs And Calories

The Truth About Carbs And Calories

The Truth About Carbs And Calories

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676169439/714001759" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Annabelle Breakey/Getty Images
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Annabelle Breakey/Getty Images

Carbs get a bad rap. Here's the science behind why eating too much starch isn't good for you — and smart tips to integrate grains into your diet.

Here's what to remember:

  • Not all calories act the same in the body.
  • Refined carbs quickly turn to sugar in your body.
  • Focus instead on slow carbs that take longer to digest. Think whole fruits, beans and whole grains.
  • If you love breads and muffins, save them for the end of your meal. Treat bread like dessert.

Recipes: Dawn Ludwig's 5-Minute Sauces

From Always Delicious, by David and Dawn Ludwig, and Always Hungry?, by David Ludwig. Used with permission.

Cashew Balsamic Dressing

Prep time: 5 minutes. Makes about 1 cup.

2 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 1/2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons water
1/2 cup neutral-tasting oil, such as high-oleic safflower or avocado oil
1/4 cup cashews

Place all the ingredients in a wide-mouthed mason jar or cup that will fit an immersion blender without splashing. Pulse a few times to blend until the cashews are in small pieces but still chunky.

Place a lid on the jar. For best results, set aside for at least one hour to allow the flavors to develop. The dressing will keep in the refrigerator for one to two weeks.

Ginger Tahini Dressing

Prep time: 5 minutes. Makes about 1 cup.

1/4 cup tahini
2 tablespoons white miso paste
1 2-inch piece ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
2 teaspoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1/2 cup warm water

Place all the ingredients in a wide-mouth mason jar or cup that will fit an immersion blender without splashing. Blend, working the blender into the pieces of ginger until smooth. Add additional water as needed to reach the desired consistency.

Place a lid on the jar. For best results, set aside for at least one hour to allow the flavors to develop. The dressing will keep in the refrigerator for one to two weeks.

Moroccan Sauce

Prep time: 7 minutes. Makes 2/3 to 3/4 cup.

1 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced into thin rounds
3 medium cloves garlic
1 3- to 4-inch piece fresh turmeric, peeled, or 1 teaspoon ground turmeric (optional)
2 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
Dash of freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground white or black pepper
9 or 10 sprigs cilantro, stems and leaves coarsely chopped
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup water
1/2 teaspoon salt
Dash of cayenne pepper, or to taste (optional)

Place all the ingredients in a wide-mouth mason jar or cup that will fit an immersion blender without splashing. Blend, working the blender in the jar until the garlic, ginger and turmeric are smooth.

Place a lid on the jar. For best results, set aside for at least one hour to allow the flavors to develop. The dressing will keep in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Thai Peanut Sauce

Prep time: 5 minutes. Makes about 1 3/4 cups.

1 large orange, 4 small clementines or 2 large tangerines, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 1/2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled
1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
1/2 cup peanut butter (no sugar added)
1 teaspoons unseasoned rice vinegar
2 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

Place all the ingredients in a wide-mouth mason jar or cup that will fit an immersion blender without splashing. Blend until the orange is fully blended and the sauce is thick and creamy. Adjust seasoning to taste.

Place a lid on the jar. Allow the flavors to develop for one hour or more in the refrigerator. The dressing will keep for about a week.

These recipes are excerpted from Always Delicious, by David and Dawn Ludwig, and Always Hungry? by David Ludwig and are used with permission.