Basketball Coach Accused Of Substituting His Triplet Sons To Win Games The high school coach in Missouri is accused of using his triplet sons to cheat. An opposing team accuses the coach of swapping in one of his three sons to gain an advantage on the free throw line.
NPR logo

Basketball Coach Accused Of Substituting His Triplet Sons To Win Games

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682133767/682133768" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Basketball Coach Accused Of Substituting His Triplet Sons To Win Games

Basketball Coach Accused Of Substituting His Triplet Sons To Win Games

Basketball Coach Accused Of Substituting His Triplet Sons To Win Games

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682133767/682133768" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The high school coach in Missouri is accused of using his triplet sons to cheat. An opposing team accuses the coach of swapping in one of his three sons to gain an advantage on the free throw line.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A high school basketball coach in Missouri is under pressure after allegedly using his triplet sons to cheat during a game. Rick Luna and his Dora High School team were playing Licking High over the weekend. Parents and players from Licking accused Coach Luna of secretly swapping in one of his three sons to gain an advantage on the free-throw line. You know, being triplets, the referee didn't notice. An investigation is ongoing, but it won't change the final score. Coach Luna and his team won by 2.

Copyright © 2019 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.