Scientists Probe Sounds In Cuba That U.S. Diplomats Complained About In 2016, diplomats said there were persistent, high-pitched sounds which left them feeling sick. Officials worried of a "sonic attack." Analysis suggests the noise could be singing of a loud cricket.
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Scientists Probe Sounds In Cuba That U.S. Diplomats Complained About

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Scientists Probe Sounds In Cuba That U.S. Diplomats Complained About

Scientists Probe Sounds In Cuba That U.S. Diplomats Complained About

Scientists Probe Sounds In Cuba That U.S. Diplomats Complained About

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682821189/682821190" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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In 2016, diplomats said there were persistent, high-pitched sounds which left them feeling sick. Officials worried of a "sonic attack." Analysis suggests the noise could be singing of a loud cricket.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. A few years ago, U.S. diplomats in Cuba complained of hearing a high-pitched tone and then getting headaches and nausea. The U.S. worried it was a sonic attack. Some diplomats recorded the sound and circulated it. Now two scientists who analyzed the recording say they know what it is. It's crickets. They add, it's not proof that the diplomats weren't targeted by something else, but that particular sound, they think - just bugs. It's MORNING EDITION.

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