Hawaii Officials Confirm The Death Of 14-Year-Old Snail George, the last of his species of Hawaiian land snail, died on New Year's Day. Wildlife biologist David Sischo tells NPR, "I very rarely saw him outside of his shell."
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Hawaii Officials Confirm The Death Of 14-Year-Old Snail

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Hawaii Officials Confirm The Death Of 14-Year-Old Snail

Hawaii Officials Confirm The Death Of 14-Year-Old Snail

Hawaii Officials Confirm The Death Of 14-Year-Old Snail

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/683144192/683144193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

George, the last of his species of Hawaiian land snail, died on New Year's Day. Wildlife biologist David Sischo tells NPR, "I very rarely saw him outside of his shell."

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin with sad news from the world of biology. The last of a particular kind of Hawaiian land snail has died. His name was George, and he was the result of a breeding effort in Hawaii to save his species.

George lived out his last days at a lab. He apparently kept to himself. Biologist David Sischo told NPR, for a snail, he was a bit of a hermit. I rarely saw him outside his shell. It's MORNING EDITION.

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