Money Moves: The Push For Financial Literacy In Schools Student loan borrowers in the U.S. collectively owe $1.5 trillion. And less than 16 percent of U.S. students are required to take a personal finance course to graduate high school.

How are we preparing young people to be smart consumers? And why isn't financial literacy a standard in our schools?
We discussed as part of our week of listener-selected show topics.

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Money Moves: The Push For Financial Literacy In Schools

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Money Moves: The Push For Financial Literacy In Schools

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Money Moves: The Push For Financial Literacy In Schools

Money Moves: The Push For Financial Literacy In Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/687924531/687931887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Federal Reserve shows that student loan borrowers in the U.S. collectively owe $1.5 trillion as of last March.

And a 2018 study by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found that nearly half of the emerging adults participating in the study were financially precarious (32 percent) or financially at-risk (36 percent).

From the study:

The low percentage of emerging adults with sound financial behaviors and attributes in the NCFS sample clearly shows the need to invest more in the financial education efforts of children and youth. It is concerning that children and youth are entering adulthood without adequate financial capabilities to ensure their future wellbeing.

According to data from Next Gen Personal Finance, less than 16 percent of U.S. students are required to take a personal finance course to graduate high school. So how are we preparing young people to be smart consumers? And why isn't financial literacy a standard in our schools?

We discussed as part of our week of listener-selected show topics.