The Year After "The Year Of The Woman" First-term Congresswomen have been dominating national politics. A wave of female candidates are leading the Democratic pack for 2020. And Republicans say they need more women elected at every level.

What are female politicians on both sides of the aisle facing at the national level? And how does the public conversation change when women run?

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The Year After "The Year Of The Woman"

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The Year After "The Year Of The Woman"

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The Year After "The Year Of The Woman"

The Year After "The Year Of The Woman"

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/690370378/690389341" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: House Democratic women pose for a portrait in front of the U.S. Capitol. The 116th Congress has the biggest number of female members ever while the number of Democratic women in the House has grown from 16 to 89 since 1989. Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: House Democratic women pose for a portrait in front of the U.S. Capitol. The 116th Congress has the biggest number of female members ever while the number of Democratic women in the House has grown from 16 to 89 since 1989.

Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

First-term Congresswomen have been dominating national politics. By now, you surely know their names: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley, Deb Haaland and Sharice Davids.

They're the new faces of liberal politics at the national level, pushing policies like the Green New Deal, Medicaid-For-All and more.

This wave came after Hillary Clinton's failed run for the presidency in 2016. Right now, Senators Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand and Elizabeth Warren, alongside Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard, are leading the Democratic pack for 2020. These progressive candidates are capitalizing on what seems like an unprecedented level of engagement with politics.

But what about Republican women? Just over a tenth of the women in Congress are Republicans. What's behind this imbalance, and how can the party elect more women at every level?

We discussed what female politicians on both sides of the aisle are facing at the national level, and how the public conversation changes when women run.