Voters In German Town Overwhelmingly Reject Naming Their Streets Hilgermissen was formed from several old villages, and no street has a name. A home address is a number, plus the name of the old village. As the town grows, officials would like to change that.
NPR logo

Voters In German Town Overwhelmingly Reject Naming Their Streets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691221564/691221565" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Voters In German Town Overwhelmingly Reject Naming Their Streets

Voters In German Town Overwhelmingly Reject Naming Their Streets

Voters In German Town Overwhelmingly Reject Naming Their Streets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691221564/691221565" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hilgermissen was formed from several old villages, and no street has a name. A home address is a number, plus the name of the old village. As the town grows, officials would like to change that.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A town in Germany voted against progress. Voters do not want their streets named. Hilgermissen was formed from several old villages, and no street has a name. Your home address is just a number plus the name of your old village. Authorities want to change that as the city grows, but the measure to name streets was defeated 60 to 40 percent. If there were more voters in favor, they apparently didn't know the address of the polling place. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2019 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.