Girl Scout Tries New Cookie Sales Strategy Ten-year-old Kayla "Kiki" Paschall posted a video of her version of Cardi B's song "Money," but changed the lyrics to be about selling Girl Scout cookies.
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Girl Scout Tries New Cookie Sales Strategy

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Girl Scout Tries New Cookie Sales Strategy

Girl Scout Tries New Cookie Sales Strategy

Girl Scout Tries New Cookie Sales Strategy

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  • Transcript

Ten-year-old Kayla "Kiki" Paschall posted a video of her version of Cardi B's song "Money," but changed the lyrics to be about selling Girl Scout cookies.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Here in California, when you're selling Girl Scout cookies, people often say, no, thanks; I'm on a diet. That's one reason 10-year-old Kayla "Kiki" Paschall says sales were low. So this year, she had a new strategy. She posted a video.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

KAYLA PASCHALL: (Rapping) Selling them cookies is my thing. Buy Thin Mints or even S'mores.

GREENE: Yep. It was her version of Cardi B's "Money," and it was a hit.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

PASCHALL: (Rapping) I got girls in my troop, cookies to the roof.

GREENE: KTLA 5 reports Kiki met her sales goal within a day.

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