Death: Talking With Kids About The End Whether it's a goldfish or Grandma, every child will experience a death at some point — and their parents will likely struggle to explain it.

Here's what to remember:
- Be honest and concrete. The cat wasn't put to sleep, and Grandma didn't go on a long journey.
- Don't overwhelm kids with too much information. They need time to process.
- Make sure kids know they're still surrounded by people who will love and support them.
- Don't be afraid to show emotion.
- When it comes to deathbed visits or funerals, tell kids what they might see and give them a choice.
- Keep the hope alive!
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Death: Talking With Kids About The End

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Death: Talking With Kids About The End

Death: Talking With Kids About The End

Death: Talking With Kids About The End

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691962201/714016461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
LA Johnson/NPR
Seeing death for the first time
LA Johnson/NPR

Whether it's a goldfish or Grandma, every child will experience a death at some point — and their parents will likely struggle to explain it.

Here are a few tips:

  • Be honest and concrete. The cat wasn't put to sleep, and Grandma didn't go on a long journey.
  • Don't overwhelm kids with too much information. They need time to process.
  • Make sure kids know they're still surrounded by people who will love and support them.
  • Don't be afraid to show emotion.
  • When it comes to deathbed visits or funerals, tell kids what they might see and give them a choice.
  • Keep the hope alive!

Resources:

Sesame Street In Communities (SSIC) — Helping Kids Grieve

SSIC Offering Comfort

SSIC Self Care