Australian Clothing Company Tweaks Who Can Vote In Baby Contest People used to vote online for the cutest kids. But as The Guardian reports, voters wrote bad things about the children. The company's staff will now pick the winners.
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Australian Clothing Company Tweaks Who Can Vote In Baby Contest

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Australian Clothing Company Tweaks Who Can Vote In Baby Contest

Australian Clothing Company Tweaks Who Can Vote In Baby Contest

Australian Clothing Company Tweaks Who Can Vote In Baby Contest

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692259147/692259152" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People used to vote online for the cutest kids. But as The Guardian reports, voters wrote bad things about the children. The company's staff will now pick the winners.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. An Australian clothing company found its promotion did not mix well with human nature. The company held baby pageants. People could vote online on the cutest little kids. But, as The Guardian reports, people did not only say who looked best. Parents described other parents' children as hideous or just plain weird. To avoid the online negative campaigning, Bonds Baby Search cut the parents out. The company's staff will pick winners, instead.

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