Panel Questions AirBRB; parking restrictions.
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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AirBRB; parking restrictions.

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We're playing this week with Roxanne Roberts, Mo Rocca and Peter Grosz. And here again is your host at the Johnny Mercer Theatre in Savannah, Ga...

(APPLAUSE)

KURTIS: ...Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill. Thank you so much, everybody. In just a minute, Bill has an affair to rhyme-ember (ph) in our Listener Limerick Challenge game. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT - that's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Mo, there's a new app called Recharge, and it lets you rent your what to people in increments of single minutes?

MO ROCCA: Cell phone.

SAGAL: No.

ROCCA: OK. Let's - your body.

(LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: Your child.

(LAUGHTER)

ROXANNE ROBERTS: Wait. It's called Recharge? Is that a hint?

SAGAL: It's called Recharge. It's a little bit of a hint because the idea is that the people who are using it who want to rent this from you for a number of minutes...

ROCCA: Oh...

SAGAL: ...Need to recharge.

ROCCA: It's your charger.

SAGAL: No.

ROCCA: It's a car battery.

SAGAL: No.

ROCCA: It's...

ROBERTS: I'm going to steal this. It's your house.

SAGAL: That's what it is, Mo.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

ROCCA: All right.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So you just whip out this app. You dial it up. You'll use the function, and you can find somewhere near you a stranger who thinks that it's totally cool to let a stranger to them...

ROCCA: Oh, my God.

SAGAL: ...Hang out in their apartment for 30 minutes.

PETER GROSZ: This should be called, like, the serial killer app.

SAGAL: Pretty much.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: For the traveler, it's a cost-effective and convenient way to pop into a clean home, destroy their bathroom, steal some Vicodin and go about your day.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right. Roxanne, driverless cars are already on the road in some cities, and everybody thinks it'll be great because they're much more efficient. It'll be - make everything better. But no. A new study has issued a warning saying that traffic will get much worse with automated vehicles because with their advanced artificial intelligence, they will refuse to do what?

ROBERTS: Parallel park.

GROSZ: Mo, this is your chance to steal from Roxanne.

ROCCA: I know.

ROBERTS: I know.

(LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: They will refuse...

SAGAL: You were - actually, you were close. Humans do this, too. We've been known to drive around blocks for, like, an extra 20 minutes.

ROCCA: The...

ROBERTS: Oh, ask for directions.

SAGAL: No, to - they have directions.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: To avoid having to do this.

ROCCA: They will refuse to look for a parking space.

SAGAL: You're right. I'm going to give it to Mo...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: ...So he can steal it back.

ROBERTS: It seems only fair.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Right.

ROBERTS: (Laughter).

SAGAL: Specifically, what they won't do is they won't pay for parking because they won't have to. You have to park your car because it can't go anywhere without you in it. Automated cars can just keep driving.

ROBERTS: Oh.

SAGAL: You see? Why pay $35 for some downtown parking lot?

ROBERTS: So it just drops me off, I go into the little house for 10 minutes to take a nap.

SAGAL: Exactly.

(LAUGHTER)

ROBERTS: The car keeps circling.

SAGAL: Yes.

ROBERTS: And I come out.

ROCCA: Yeah...

SAGAL: Exactly. You get to do what you need to do. And you're making your appointment. You're stealing their Vicodin - whatever. And the car does what it wants, which is kill more pedestrians. And then you meet up again.

GROSZ: I also like the idea that, like, you go inside while you do what you're doing while car goes out and drives - what it does. And I just think, like, a driverless car without a person in it is, like, whee.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: It's, like, I love my life driving. I can do whatever I want.

ROBERTS: Can it steal Mr. Sexy license plate?

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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