The Strike That Changed U.S. Labor The 1937 union agreement between GM and the United Auto Workers union ushered in a period of strength for organized labor. Today, labor is nowhere near as powerful as it used to be. What happened?
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The Strike That Changed U.S. Labor

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The Strike That Changed U.S. Labor

The Strike That Changed U.S. Labor

The Strike That Changed U.S. Labor

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/694490000/694551526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The 1937 union agreement between GM and the United Auto Workers union ushered in a period of strength for organized labor. Today, labor is nowhere near as powerful as it used to be. What happened?

Sheldon Dick/Getty Images
Members of the nascent United Auto Workers Union (UAW) during a sit-down strike in the General Motors Fisher Body Plant in Flint, Michigan. (Photo by Sheldon Dick/Getty Images)
Sheldon Dick/Getty Images