The New Sexual Revolution: Polyamory On The Rise What does it take to make a polyamorous relationship work? Is maintaining such a complex network of connections really worth it?

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The New Sexual Revolution: Polyamory On The Rise

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The New Sexual Revolution: Polyamory On The Rise

1A

The New Sexual Revolution: Polyamory On The Rise

The New Sexual Revolution: Polyamory On The Rise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695731314/695743953" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In the wake of Valentine's Day, maybe you're thinking about your partner (or lack of one).

For many people, "partner" doesn't need to be a singular idea. Polyamory, or ethical non-monogamy, "can involve any number of people, either cohabiting or not, sometimes all having sex with each other, and sometimes just in couples within the larger group," The Atlantic reports.

And it might be more common than you think.

From Quartz:

What research there is suggests otherwise: a survey of some 8,700 US single adults in 2017 found that more than one in five engaged in consensual non-monogamy at some point in their lives, while in a 2014 survey 4%-5% of Americans reported currently being polyamorous.

The potential benefits of disclosure can be great: including finding the kinds of loving, sustainable connections that affirm who you really are, not just who others say you're supposed to be.

The risks...well, they can be high.

What does it take to make a polyamorous relationship work? Is it just a way of excusing infidelity or indecisiveness? And is maintaining such a complex network of connections, really worth it?