College Lacrosse Superstar Has A Problem: His Big Head Alex Chu is a freshman at Wheaton College, where he was recruited to play goalie. But because his head won't fit into a regular helmet, he's been benched. A custom helmet costs thousands of dollars.
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College Lacrosse Superstar Has A Problem: His Big Head

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College Lacrosse Superstar Has A Problem: His Big Head

College Lacrosse Superstar Has A Problem: His Big Head

College Lacrosse Superstar Has A Problem: His Big Head

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695874090/695874091" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Alex Chu is a freshman at Wheaton College, where he was recruited to play goalie. But because his head won't fit into a regular helmet, he's been benched. A custom helmet costs thousands of dollars.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Rachel Martin. Nineteen-year-old Alex Chu is a lacrosse superstar. He is also a freshman at Wheaton College where he was recruited to play goalie. But he can't because he has a really large head. In high school, Alex used two helmets forged together. But that doesn't meet NCAA double standards, and a custom helmet would cost tens of thousands of dollars. His mom told The Boston Globe, quote, "all he wants is to play lacrosse." He's got the dedication. He's got the skill. He just needs the helmet. It's MORNING EDITION.

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